R&Design: Bario Neal’s Secrets to Ethical Jewelry Design (Q&A)

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Anna Bario is taking her sustainable jewelry line Bario Neal to a whole new level. Founded in 2007, Bario Neal’s celebrated jewelry is handmade in their Philadelphia studio and shop using reclaimed precious metals, fairmined gold, and ethically-sourced gemstones and they just opened the doors to a brand spanking new showroom in New York City this past fall.

I caught up with Bario, one half of the Bario Neal power duo, which includes co-founder Page Neal, to find out how she manages it all.

Guest column written by REBECCA MIR GRADY

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R&Design: Susan Domelsmith Celebrates Dirty Librarian Chains’ Tenth Year

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This year, Susan Domelsmith’s recycled jewelry line Dirty Librarian Chains celebrates it’s tenth birthday! To mark the milestone moment, she’s just launched a new home line which she debuted alongside her most recent jewelry collection at pop-up shop Market 605 during New York Fashion Week this season—our very own Emma was there to celebrate with Domelsmith at the kick-off event.

Guest column written by REBECCA MIR GRADY

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My big sis, Rebecca Mir Grady, has done gone and launched her highly anticipated eponymous jewelry line and she (quite obviously) gives me the exclusive first interview!
Made with entirely by hand in Chicago, Illinois, Rebecca makes all of her jewelry by hand from 100% reclaimed precious metals and ethically-sourced stones. I am one proud younger sister.
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Past Fashion Future: Rebecca Mir Grady Jewelry has been a labor of love for years, tell me about the journey to launching your eponymous line.

Rebecca Mir Grady: I took a few classes in jewelry making in high school, and loved it so much that my art teacher arranged an apprenticeship for me with two jewelry designers. I went to art school, and worked on a larger scale with sculpture and ceramics. My studio art practice now involves bookmaking and comics, and larger temporary installations of paper, rope and other materials. At the same time, I’ve continued to make jewelry in my studio. 
At first, I made simple easy to wear pieces for myself, friends and family: a silver necklace that my friend Andrea could wear everyday at work, super thin gold rings that my sisters and I could wear everyday, and gold earrings that I could live in.
PFF: Yeah, as you know, I wear the two gold Thetas rings that you made for me stacked on my right finger every day—I never take them off. They are classic jewelry staples and I love their timeless aesthetic.
RMG: You’re very welcome, my dear! Then I made a necklace with book pages detailing some favorite places that my girlfriend and I had visited, and some necklaces that echoed the drawings of icebergs in some of my comics. From there, I wanted to keep going. The rest of the collection came together quickly. 

PFF: Tell me about the inspiration behind your debut collection.

RMG: This collection is full of favorites that I want to share - pieces that I wear everyday and love. 
The rings and cuffs have clean lines inspired by the shapes of the planes that Aviation Pioneers Amelia Earhart and Beryl Markham flew. The silver studs Em, En, Dash and Rule, all take their cues from my interests in bookmaking and letterpress. 
Living in the Midwest, I often think about being in between the mountains and the ocean, so I wanted to have a few pieces to represent both, mountains and the ocean – the Appalachian studs, and Falkland and Greenland iceberg necklaces. 
PFF: What is the most popular style? 
RMG: The skinny Markham ring, it’s a 6mm open cuff style ring, so the sizing is more flexible than a closed ring, and the width is substantial, yet easy to wear comfortably. 

PFF: Where is the collection currently available?

RMG: It’s available online at www.rebeccamirgrady.com

PFF: What is your dream for future of your line?

RMG: I want to introduce pieces for men, and also a collection of wedding bands. 
Image: Appalachian stud earrings. Photo courtesy Rebecca Mir Grady Jewelry.
Copyright © 2013 Past Fashion Future. All rights reserved.

My big sis, Rebecca Mir Grady, has done gone and launched her highly anticipated eponymous jewelry line and she (quite obviously) gives me the exclusive first interview!

Made with entirely by hand in Chicago, Illinois, Rebecca makes all of her jewelry by hand from 100% reclaimed precious metals and ethically-sourced stones. I am one proud younger sister.

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Meet Pamela Love, a household name among the fashion set, who designs fierce, statement-making jewelry. Don’t miss my exclusive interview with the CFDA-Award winning designer in the current issue of Foam magazine.
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Check out an excerpt, below, and read it online on Foammagazine.com, here.

"When I was little, I [remember noticing] my mom had holes in her ears and wore long earrings,” says Pamela Love, creative director and founder of the jewelry brand that over the past few years has made hers a fashionable household name. “I was obsessed with the fact people would puncture themselves to be able to wear jewelry.”
That memory left an indelible impression. Known for creating eye-catching and edgy pieces, Love, 31, uses animal iconography and universal symbols to channel what she describes as a “timeless kind of strength.” Talon cuff bracelets, arrowhead pendants and rosary necklaces with a dagger in place of a cross represent her diverse repertoire.

Image: Pamela Love. Photo by Drew Reilly.

Meet Pamela Love, a household name among the fashion set, who designs fierce, statement-making jewelry. Don’t miss my exclusive interview with the CFDA-Award winning designer in the current issue of Foam magazine.

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My Cold Spring & Beacon, New York Antiquing Bounty: an emerald cross necklace, polka dot hanky, a dish from Popolo, Italy (that I’ll use for jewelry), a linen map of Martinique island, and clip on earrings. I had so much fun (and couldn’t hold myself back from purchasing these items). I can’t wait to wear the cross, I just have to get it fixed first (I dropped it and one of the stones fell out—better now than later)!

My Cold Spring & Beacon, New York Antiquing Bounty: an emerald cross necklace, polka dot hanky, a dish from Popolo, Italy (that I’ll use for jewelry), a linen map of Martinique island, and clip on earrings. I had so much fun (and couldn’t hold myself back from purchasing these items). I can’t wait to wear the cross, I just have to get it fixed first (I dropped it and one of the stones fell out—better now than later)!

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Monique Pean's collection of handmade fine jewelry for Fall/Winter 2012 offers exquisite pieces that you can add to your gift wish list now. 
Pean uses 100% recycled metals and conflict-free diamonds, support fair trade and artisans, and gathers all materials following environmentally-responsible methods. The pieces are as sustainable as they are beautiful, so it’s also no wonder that Michelle Obama is a fan of the wooly mammoth bone jewelry.
Continue reading—and view more pics—in my feature article for Discovery’s TreeHugger.com, here: Monique Pean Turns Mammoth Bone Into Striking Sustainable Jewelry

Monique Pean's collection of handmade fine jewelry for Fall/Winter 2012 offers exquisite pieces that you can add to your gift wish list now.

Pean uses 100% recycled metals and conflict-free diamonds, support fair trade and artisans, and gathers all materials following environmentally-responsible methods. The pieces are as sustainable as they are beautiful, so it’s also no wonder that Michelle Obama is a fan of the wooly mammoth bone jewelry.

Continue reading—and view more pics—in my feature article for Discovery’s TreeHugger.com, here: Monique Pean Turns Mammoth Bone Into Striking Sustainable Jewelry

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Adding to their creative ways of turning Vietnam War scrap metal into accessories, Article 22 releases a colorful Peacebomb Resolution Wrap Bracelet just in time for  New Year’s. Made with a hand cast bomb metal tag and finished with  vintage silk string from France, each bracelet—available for $16 on Peace-Bomb.com—helps clear a meter of bomb-littered land.
Continue reading my article on Discovery’s TreeHugger.com, here.

Adding to their creative ways of turning Vietnam War scrap metal into accessories, Article 22 releases a colorful Peacebomb Resolution Wrap Bracelet just in time for New Year’s. Made with a hand cast bomb metal tag and finished with vintage silk string from France, each bracelet—available for $16 on Peace-Bomb.com—helps clear a meter of bomb-littered land.

Continue reading my article on Discovery’s TreeHugger.com, here.

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Peace bomb bracelets have a story to tell: each one has been made with repurposed Vietnam War scrap metal. And Article 22 founder and designer Elizabeth Suda has a story to tell about the people of Laos and the Secret War that effects their lives to this day.
Last October, I wrote about how Suda and her team were traveling to Laos to shoot a short  documentary on the process of turning bombs into bracelets. Well, the  video is here. Plus, two more bracelets, which are conveniently  available online at Peace-Bomb.com.
Continue reading my article on Discovery’s TreeHugger.com.
Photo: A Lao metal smith makes spoons from war scrap metal; credit: Article 22.

Peace bomb bracelets have a story to tell: each one has been made with repurposed Vietnam War scrap metal. And Article 22 founder and designer Elizabeth Suda has a story to tell about the people of Laos and the Secret War that effects their lives to this day.

Last October, I wrote about how Suda and her team were traveling to Laos to shoot a short documentary on the process of turning bombs into bracelets. Well, the video is here. Plus, two more bracelets, which are conveniently available online at Peace-Bomb.com.

Continue reading my article on Discovery’s TreeHugger.com.

Photo: A Lao metal smith makes spoons from war scrap metal; credit: Article 22.

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Back to the Earth Bauble Rings by Todd Reed.
In Boulder, Colorado, Todd Reed is crafting handmade jewelry with recycled precious metals and his  signature, raw and uncut diamonds. What is so striking about Reed’s  designs is that they actually look like they came from the earth. While  some seek the perfectly-cut diamond popular in contemporary jewelry,  Reed designs with the natural form of the diamond in mind.
Continue reading my article on Discovery’s TreeeHugger.com

Back to the Earth Bauble Rings by Todd Reed.

In Boulder, Colorado, Todd Reed is crafting handmade jewelry with recycled precious metals and his signature, raw and uncut diamonds. What is so striking about Reed’s designs is that they actually look like they came from the earth. While some seek the perfectly-cut diamond popular in contemporary jewelry, Reed designs with the natural form of the diamond in mind.

Continue reading my article on Discovery’s TreeeHugger.com

Comments
Dirty Librarian Chains' (DLC Brooklyn) modern jewelry is handmade in Brooklyn by designer Susan Domelsmith, using vintage and dead-stock jewelry.
Domelsmith channels Mesoamerican culture and merges elegance with edge  in a striking fall 2011 collection of bracelets, brooches, necklaces,  earrings, and more.
View more photos in my original article on Discovery’s TreeHugger.com, here.

Dirty Librarian Chains' (DLC Brooklyn) modern jewelry is handmade in Brooklyn by designer Susan Domelsmith, using vintage and dead-stock jewelry.

Domelsmith channels Mesoamerican culture and merges elegance with edge in a striking fall 2011 collection of bracelets, brooches, necklaces, earrings, and more.

View more photos in my original article on Discovery’s TreeHugger.com, here.

Comments
EXCLUSIVE: “My Red Carpet Look at Runway to Green, My New Ethical Fashion Initiative, and More” by Zani Gugelmann  Vogue Magazine has always been very supportive of me; they were the first to launch my jewelry line, Filigrana by Zani, in their September issue of 2002 and they’ve continued to stand behind me both as a designer and as an individual. When they invited me to be on the Honarary Host Committee of Runway to Green’s Bid to Save the Earth event, I felt honored. It was quite a coincidence, actually, since at that time I had just begun researching ethical and environmental fashion. I decided to focus on my passion and bring together all my contacts, that I have made over the last ten years of living in New York City, to help bring awareness to the issues surrounding ethical fashion.Filigrana and Santo by ZaniI started my first jewelry line, Filigrana by Zani, in 2002. All the pieces were made of gold and silver filigree. I would design the pieces in NYC and then have them made by local artisans in northern Peru, close to where my mother was brought up. 
Then in 2008, I launched another a more conceptual jewelry line, called Santo by Zani. The line consists of 3 different bullets which you can personally design on the website by choosing the gems and metals. Based on the definition of a “silver bullet,” a simple solution to what seems to be a complicated situation, the bullets unscrew to reveal a little scroll where you can write a goal. Each time you wear it, you’re reminded that it’s not difficult to reach you goal, you just have to focus on it.I’m now starting a new chapter in my life focusing on ethical and environmental fashion, which is not too far off from what I was doing before, working with artisans in Peru and raising awareness abroad of their beautiful work.Finding a Red Carpet Look for Runway to Green The event crept up on me so quickly and I was far from prepared. I wanted to search for a sustainable dress that would suit my taste, however, there weren’t many options out there and time was running short. So I decided to focus on the jewelry and I knew exactly where to go: Monique Pean. 
Monique is an amazing designer, individual, and a dear friend. I have always admired her jewelry for many reasons, not only are the designs beautiful but the materials are ethically- and environmentally-sourced, including stones, which are sourced through the United Nations-approved “Kimberley Process,” which prevents conflict stones from entering the legitimate diamond market.
For the event, I chose a conflict- and devastation-free diamond slice and 18k recycled yellow gold necklace and a peach conflict- and devastation-free natural aquamarine and diamond ring with 18k recycled rose gold. 
Overall, “the look” was a huge success. The crowd was great at the Runway to Green’s Bid to Save the Earth event; it felt like a celebration to “save the earth,” especially after the shocking tsunami in Japan, people were enthusiastic and happy to be able to be a part of such an event. 
They were also very generous during the auction (they raised $1.26 million in one night!) and the Runway to Green fashion show was stunning, it was quite a sight to be seen.
I look forward to meeting more partners in crime in creating a global movement - making ethical and environmental fashion, fashionable. I have a project in the works, so wish me luck. I’m going to give it a try — stay tuned!
- This is a guest post written by Zani Gugelmann for PastFashionFuture.com
I met Zani last year when she approached me to discuss the ethical fashion project she mentions above; we later collaborated on the project and have stayed in touch since. I thought Runway to Green would be a great opportunity to share the story behind the style, while channeling Livia Firth’s Green Carpet challenge and getting the word out about Zani’s new project. As she said, keep tuned! (Photo: courtesy Zani Gugelmann.)
Copyright © 2011 Emma Grady. All rights reserved.

EXCLUSIVE: “My Red Carpet Look at Runway to Green, My New Ethical Fashion Initiative, and More” by Zani Gugelmann
 
Vogue Magazine has always been very supportive of me; they were the first to launch my jewelry line, Filigrana by Zani, in their September issue of 2002 and they’ve continued to stand behind me both as a designer and as an individual. When they invited me to be on the Honarary Host Committee of Runway to Green’s Bid to Save the Earth event, I felt honored.

It was quite a coincidence, actually, since at that time I had just begun researching ethical and environmental fashion. I decided to focus on my passion and bring together all my contacts, that I have made over the last ten years of living in New York City, to help bring awareness to the issues surrounding ethical fashion.

Filigrana and Santo by Zani

I started my first jewelry line, Filigrana by Zani, in 2002. All the pieces were made of gold and silver filigree. I would design the pieces in NYC and then have them made by local artisans in northern Peru, close to where my mother was brought up.


Then in 2008, I launched another a more conceptual jewelry line, called Santo by Zani. The line consists of 3 different bullets which you can personally design on the website by choosing the gems and metals. Based on the definition of a “silver bullet,” a simple solution to what seems to be a complicated situation, the bullets unscrew to reveal a little scroll where you can write a goal. Each time you wear it, you’re reminded that it’s not difficult to reach you goal, you just have to focus on it.

I’m now starting a new chapter in my life focusing on ethical and environmental fashion, which is not too far off from what I was doing before, working with artisans in Peru and raising awareness abroad of their beautiful work.

Finding a Red Carpet Look for Runway to Green

The event crept up on me so quickly and I was far from prepared. I wanted to search for a sustainable dress that would suit my taste, however, there weren’t many options out there and time was running short. So I decided to focus on the jewelry and I knew exactly where to go: Monique Pean.

Monique is an amazing designer, individual, and a dear friend. I have always admired her jewelry for many reasons, not only are the designs beautiful but the materials are ethically- and environmentally-sourced, including stones, which are sourced through the United Nations-approved “Kimberley Process,” which prevents conflict stones from entering the legitimate diamond market.


For the event, I chose a conflict- and devastation-free diamond slice and 18k recycled yellow gold necklace and a peach conflict- and devastation-free natural aquamarine and diamond ring with 18k recycled rose gold.

Overall, “the look” was a huge success.

The crowd was great at the Runway to Green’s Bid to Save the Earth event; it felt like a celebration to “save the earth,” especially after the shocking tsunami in Japan, people were enthusiastic and happy to be able to be a part of such an event.

They were also very generous during the auction (they raised $1.26 million in one night!) and the Runway to Green fashion show was stunning, it was quite a sight to be seen.


I look forward to meeting more partners in crime in creating a global movement - making ethical and environmental fashion, fashionable. I have a project in the works, so wish me luck. I’m going to give it a try — stay tuned!

- This is a guest post written by Zani Gugelmann for PastFashionFuture.com

I met Zani last year when she approached me to discuss the ethical fashion project she mentions above; we later collaborated on the project and have stayed in touch since. I thought Runway to Green would be a great opportunity to share the story behind the style, while channeling Livia Firth’s Green Carpet challenge and getting the word out about Zani’s new project. As she said, keep tuned! (Photo: courtesy Zani Gugelmann.)

Copyright © 2011 Emma Grady. All rights reserved.

Comments
This is a sad, sad day: Dame Elizabeth Taylor has passed away. While many know her as a screen legend, she’ll forever be a style legend.
Taylor represents an elegance that we rarely see these days. I’m disappointed that she is often defined by—and admired for—her jewels, husbands and co-stars. I’m also sad that I’ll never have the opportunity to interview her. I would have loved to share the story of a woman who has lived an amazing life. Her jewels, as she makes very clear in her interview for Harper’s Bazaar, were just that, accessories—not the end all be all in life.
The jewelry didn’t make Elizabeth Taylor, she made the jewelry.
That being said, this is her Lamartine bracelet, designed by Van Cleef & Arpels, featuring yellow gold, platinum, diamonds, coral, and amethyst. Richard Burton bought this bracelet, along with matching earrings, for her  in Geneva in 1971 “to highlight her violet eyes.”
It is currently on view through June 5, at the Cooper-Hewitt’s “Set in Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels” exhibit.
 Photo credit: John Bigelow Taylor

This is a sad, sad day: Dame Elizabeth Taylor has passed away. While many know her as a screen legend, she’ll forever be a style legend.

Taylor represents an elegance that we rarely see these days. I’m disappointed that she is often defined by—and admired for—her jewels, husbands and co-stars. I’m also sad that I’ll never have the opportunity to interview her. I would have loved to share the story of a woman who has lived an amazing life. Her jewels, as she makes very clear in her interview for Harper’s Bazaar, were just that, accessories—not the end all be all in life.

The jewelry didn’t make Elizabeth Taylor, she made the jewelry.

That being said, this is her Lamartine bracelet, designed by Van Cleef & Arpels, featuring yellow gold, platinum, diamonds, coral, and amethyst. Richard Burton bought this bracelet, along with matching earrings, for her  in Geneva in 1971 “to highlight her violet eyes.”

It is currently on view through June 5, at the Cooper-Hewitt’s “Set in Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels” exhibit.


Photo credit: John Bigelow Taylor

Comments
This past weekend I visited the Cooper-Hewitt’s current exhibit, “Set in Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels,” on view through June 5.
The jewelry, which has been worn by the likes of Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco and Elizabeth  Taylor, was timeless in its design and also multifunctional. Take, for example, the Walska Brooch/Pendant above. The wings come off to form earrings, the tail comes off to form a brooch, and the pendant can be detached and worn separately. Now it makes perfect sense that if you’re going to invest in jewels you’d want to make the most of its wear. Elegance is seeing the true value — and potential — of an accessory, and in this case, a gem.
Visit Set in Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels, for more photos.
Photo credit: Cooper-Hewitt

This past weekend I visited the Cooper-Hewitt’s current exhibit, “Set in Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels,” on view through June 5.

The jewelry, which has been worn by the likes of Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco and Elizabeth Taylor, was timeless in its design and also multifunctional. Take, for example, the Walska Brooch/Pendant above. The wings come off to form earrings, the tail comes off to form a brooch, and the pendant can be detached and worn separately. Now it makes perfect sense that if you’re going to invest in jewels you’d want to make the most of its wear. Elegance is seeing the true value — and potential — of an accessory, and in this case, a gem.

Visit Set in Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels, for more photos.

Photo credit: Cooper-Hewitt

Comments